ProofreadingServices.com Poetry Scholarship Opportunity!

ProofreadingServices.com is offering a Video Poetry scholarship to high school, Undergraduate, and Graduate students.

The Gist:

    • Applicants will write an original poem in English and perform it in a YouTube video.
    • Three scholarships will be award to university students (graduate and undergraduate.
    • Applicants will write an original poem in English and perform it in a YouTube video.
    • We will award six scholarships ranging from $100 to $500. Three scholarships will be awarded to high school seniors, and three will be awarded to university students (graduate students and undergraduate students are judged in the same category).

Deadline

    • Submissions must be received by noon (US Eastern time) on February 29, 2016.
    • Winners will be announced in June 2016, and their entries will be posted on our blog for thousands of poetry lovers to view.
    • Applicants will write an original poem in English and perform it in a YouTube video.
    • We will award six scholarships ranging from $100 to $500. Three scholarships will be awarded to high school seniors, and three will be awarded to university students (graduate students and undergraduate students are judged in the same category).

Awards:

    • 1st Place: $500
    • 2nd Place: $300
    • 3rd Place: $100

Guidelines:

    • You must write an original poem in English that does not include content that would be considered unacceptable in a school environment. You’ll then recite the poem in a YouTube video. There is no minimum or maximum length.
    • Your video cannot contain background music, digital sound effects, or images- only you reciting your 100% original poem.
    • Your YouTube video must be titled “ProofreadingServices.com Poetry Scholarship Entry – [Applicant’s First Name]”. Go to ProofreadingServices.com for the official entry form and additional information. http://www.proofreadingservices.com/pages/scholarship-application
    • More than one entry can be submitted by an applicant. You must complete a separate application for each submission.

– See more at: http://www.proofreadingservices.com/pages/scholarship#sthash.9gxZZAaw.dpuf

Please Join Us! Grad School Information Chat Monday, November 9th

Join the

English Department

for the

FALL 2015

ENGLISH MAJOR

GRAD SCHOOL INFORMATION CHAT

Monday, November 9th

** NAB Room 3117

Common Hour

2:303:50 PM

Light refreshments will be served.

This event is co-sponsored by the

Division of Student Affairs

Hosted by the

SUNY Old Westbury English Department

For more information contact Prof. Danielle Lee at LeeD@oldwestbury.edu

From Bachelor to Master: Part 2 of a 3-part Blog Series by Jonathan Noyes

image1I’ve made it to the halfway mark and let me assure you, the work load is not slowing down! In fact, it’s only quickening its pace. It is important to remain vigilant, and remind myself that as I work through intellectually, emotionally, and physically trying times, I am the best version of myself.

 

Professor Torrell would always reassure our summer Senior Seminar II class of this as we worked tirelessly through the hectic conclusion of the English undergraduate program while most of our classmates from the previous semester were elsewhere on vacation. Old Westbury English undergraduates who take Senior Seminar I and II will be given a taste of the extent to which the graduate program goes to educate its disciples, and should continue practicing effective time management, as it is arguably the most important aspect of keeping anxiety low and staying on track. Especially for those who plan to pursue an MAT in English, be sure to collect reading lists as soon as possible, and read on! In some cases, certain content may need to be read multiple times which can become quite time-consuming, so be sure to pace yourself. As English majors, we love the many processes involved with literature, but in the graduate program, we must allow ourselves more time to ensure proper retention and reflection of the literature we read. Reading and analyzing at least two books per week sounds easier than it is in the midst of working and attending to obligations outside of campus. While I don’t find the curriculum to be much more difficult conceptually (the English undergraduate program does a grade job preparing its students), it is undoubtedly more work at a faster pace.

Continue reading